Hello! My name is Nykolle. You can call me that, doodle, or anything you deem suitable.

This is mostly a multi-fandom blog, mixed with things I find amusing/interesting. I take no responsibility for the terror your eyes will undoubtedly witness here. Feel free to chat with me or ask any kind of questions! I am not shy and am willing to help to the best of my abilities. The bolded is what I am reblogging most at this time of year.

Contact: nykollenyx@gmail.com

Things I like:

Shingeki no Kyojin, Game of Thrones, Evangelion, Lord of the Rings, BBC Sherlock, Supernatural, Free!, Avatar: The Last Airbender/Korra, Pokemon, Naruto, Ookiku Furikabutte, The Avengers, How to Train Your Dragon, Disney, Harry Potter, Sherlock Holmes, Aitsu no Daihonmei, The Amazing Spiderman, The Hunger Games

Other:

Animals, These Lovely Ladies, Funny Tag, Feminism, Personal

Important Things!

me trying to read fanfiction

conversationparade:

‘she tripped, but a pair of strong arms grabbed hold of her from behind before she hit the floor’

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‘…she tilted her head back to look into his eyes, enjoying the feel of his warm arms wrapped around her torso’

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‘…her hands intertwined behind his neck as their lips met’

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‘…she wrapped her legs around his waist as

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I adore the way fan fiction writers engage with and critique source texts, by manipulating them and breaking their rules. Some of it is straight-up homage, but a lot of [fan fiction] is really aggressive towards the source text. One tends to think of it as written by total fanboys and fangirls as a kind of worshipful act, but a lot of times you’ll read these stories and it’ll be like ‘What if Star Trek had an openly gay character on the bridge?’ And of course the point is that they don’t, and they wouldn’t, because they don’t have the balls, or they are beholden to their advertisers, or whatever. There’s a powerful critique, almost punk-like anger, being expressed there—which I find fascinating and interesting and cool.

Lev Grossman (via theadventuresofcargline)

This is very true - I’ve seen innumerable fanfics of people saying, “I could do this better than they did.”

And quite frequently, they do.

(via lil-miss-choc)

(Source: hp2012.org)

     

onetraveller:

holywatered:

when you think about it fanfiction is actually amazing

there are thousands of brilliantly written novel-length stories kids wrote from their own brains about characters and shows/books/movies they love all twined into the internet and other kids read these 50k+ stories in their own time and invest themselves in it

nobody’s being paid to write it and nobody’s being told to read it, people do it because they legitimately enjoy it

that is just kind of amazing

#and fanvids #and fandom in general #it’s a (largely) art-centric community built around distance which is really amazing if you think about it #like most grad programs for the arts or artist communes or what have you are all about being locked into a singular place with similar pe… #*people for a predetermined amount of time #just so you can have that energy and produce and critique each other #and fandom has created that here #i mean it predates the internet (with the zine and the trekkie letter circles and whatnot) #and the fact is that somehow we all googled and ended up here #and if you think about it it’s one of the last open apprenticeship places around #fascinated with henry jenkins’ theory that it has to do with women being excluded from other circles of art and making their own in a spa… #*space of their own #(not just women; other minorities as well) #fandom is largely about reclamation and not just narratives but people and issues and things we care about #we come here and we make awful things and we read more and we teach ourselves how to be better #artist commune unto itself #messy yes but also free and open and largely informational #think of how many tuts exist for photoshop #at it’s heart fandom is about art for art’s sake #that’s why i’m surprised people don’t want to study it more #(and believe me when i say i know it’s because at heart people think we are worthless #because we are doing something that is not for profit and only for love #because we are messing around with characters that are not our own #but that kind of misses the point doesn’t it? because the point of fandom is to make it our own because no one is going to make our art f… #*for us in the way that we want) #isn’t it funny how everyone has a ‘when i first started my shit was so awful’ story? #i just want to be like how did you get better? who did you read? whose graphics did you look at? what videos did you watch? #because chances are you were inculcated into this culture the same way everybody else was - by participating in it #and how many other things in the world can you say that about now (for free)?

downtothelastbullet:

As a professor, may I ask you what you think about fanfiction?

I think fanfiction is literature and literature, for the most part, is fanfiction, and that anyone that dismisses it simply on the grounds that it’s derivative knows fuck-all about literature and needs to get the hell off my lawn.

Most of the history of Western literature (and probably much of non-Western literature, but I can’t speak to that) is adapted or appropriated from something else.  Homer wrote historyfic and Virgil wrote Homerfic and Dante wrote Virgilfic (where he makes himself a character and writes himself hanging out with Homer and Virgil and they’re like “OMG Dante you’re so cool.”  He was the original Gary Stu).  Milton wrote Bible fanfic, and everyone and their mom spent the Middle Ages writing King Arthur fanfic.  In the sixteenth century you and another dude could translate the same Petrarchan sonnet and somehow have it count as two separate poems, and no one gave a fuck.  Shakespeare doesn’t have a single original plot—although much of it would be more rightly termed RPF—and then John Fletcher and Mary Cowden Clarke and Gloria Naylor and Jane Smiley and Stephen Sondheim wrote Shakespeare fanfic.  Guys like Pope and Dryden took old narratives and rewrote them to make fun of people they didn’t like, because the eighteenth century was basically high school.  And Spenser!  Don’t even get me started on Spenser.

Here’s what fanfic authors/fans need to remember when anyone gives them shit: the idea that originality is somehow a good thing, an innately preferable thing, is a completely modern notion.  Until about three hundred years ago, a good writer, by and large, was someone who could take a tried-and-true story and make it even more awesome.  (If you want to sound fancy, the technical term is imitatio.)  People were like, why would I wanna read something about some dude I’ve never heard of?  There’s a new Sir Gawain story out, man!  (As to when and how that changed, I tend to blame Daniel Defoe, or the Modernists, or reality television, depending on my mood.)

I also find fanfic fascinating because it takes all the barriers that keep people from professional authorship—barriers that have weakened over the centuries but are nevertheless still very real—and blows right past them. Producing literature, much less circulating it, was something that was well nigh impossible for the vast majority of people for most of human history.  First you had to live in a culture where people thought it was acceptable for you to even want to be literate in the first place.  And then you had to find someone who could teach you how to read and write (the two didn’t necessarily go together).  And you needed sufficient leisure time to learn.  And be able to afford books, or at least be friends with someone rich enough to own books who would lend them to you.  Good writers are usually well-read and professional writing is a full-time job, so you needed a lot of books, and a lot of leisure time both for reading and writing.  And then you had to be in a high enough social position that someone would take you seriously and want to read your work—to have access to circulation/publication in addition to education and leisure time.  A very tiny percentage of the population fit those parameters (in England, which is the only place I can speak of with some authority, that meant from 500-1000 A.D.: monks; 1000-1500: aristocratic men and the very occasional aristocratic woman; 1500-1800: aristocratic men, some middle-class men, a few aristocratic women; 1800-on, some middle-class women as well). 

What’s amazing is how many people who didn’t fit those parameters kept writing in spite of the constant message they got from society that no one cared about what they had to say, writing letters and diaries and stories and poems that often weren’t discovered until hundreds of years later.  Humans have an urge to express themselves, to tell stories, and fanfic lets them.  If you’ve got access to a computer and an hour or two to while away of an evening, you can create something that people will see and respond to instantly, with a built-in community of people who care about what you have to say.

I do write the occasional fic; I wish I had the time and mental energy to write more.  I’ll admit I don’t read a lot of fic these days because most of it is not—and I know how snobbish this sounds—particularly well-written.  That doesn’t mean it’s “not good”—there are a lot of reasons people read fic and not all of them have to do with wanting to read finely crafted prose.  That’s why fic is awesome—it creates a place for all kinds of storytelling.  But for me personally, now that my job entails reading about 1500 pages of undergraduate writing per year, when I have time to read for enjoyment I want it to be by someone who really knows what they’re doing.  There’s tons of high-quality fic, of course, but I no longer have the time and patience to go searching for it that I had ten years ago. 

But whether I’m reading it or not, I love that fanfiction exists.  Because without people doing what fanfiction writers do, literature wouldn’t exist.  (And then I’d be out of a job and, frankly, I don’t know how to do anything else.)

(Source: inkandcayenne)

do you guys ever hear music so specific in your head at the beginning of a fic scene that you feel the need to type out deee dun dun deeee duuuunnnnn

The Giraffe Notes - PODFIC

thegiraffenotes:

Because I’m a very lucky person lunchy_munchy used my blanket permission for podfics (art, remixes, etc.) to record a podfic of The Giraffe Notes. It’s available both as an audiobook and as an mp3 file, so if that’s your kind of thing run over to her/his/its LJ for the download links. <3

-Dean makes Cas try pie-

‘Behold,’ Sam thinks as he watches, ‘the great and mighty human subspecies Dean in his peculiar but fascinating mating dance. In order to interest his potential mate into coupling, he first demonstrates his ability to provide sustenance.’


From: Sam is a Genius (Everyone is Dumb)